>

The First Class degrees galore By Reuben Abati

Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr +

The Daily Trust newspaper published an interesting story (May 15) about the sudden increase in the number of First Class grades produced by Nigerian universities.
Daily Trust reports that its research reveals that in the past five years, 16 Nigerian universities have produced a total of 3, 499 first-class graduates. Between 2011 and 2016, 12 of these universities produced 2, 822 First Class graduates, and it seems that this First Class galore is a growing fashion particularly among private universities.

Daily Trust reports that its research reveals that in the past five years, 16 Nigerian universities have produced a total of 3, 499 first-class graduates. Between 2011 and 2016, 12 of these universities produced 2, 822 First Class graduates, and it seems that this First Class galore is a growing fashion particularly among private universities.
This trend tends to be a good thing: if Nigeria can produce more First Class intellect, this should reflect the long-term commercial, social, economic and cultural life of the country.

We would have more doctorates hopefully, and thus produce more qualified, academic research, especially now that about 60% of Nigerian university professors do not have a doctorate. The brighter people a country’s education system can produce, the better, such people can effectively make a significant difference and lead the leadership process on all fronts.

The only problem is that this growing trend needs to be questioned. Previously, a First Class title, the equivalent of a Distinction, was somewhat rare, granted by Departments after careful consideration.
I am not sure that the entire Faculty of Arts of the University of Ibadan would have awarded up to 3,000 First Class titles in the entire history of that Faculty. The university departments spoke of a First Class as if it were a comet. When students got a 2: 1, they were the true lords of the Department, and even then a 2: 1 was never given on bus loads.

I remember the story of a former Calabar University colleague who was denied a First Class in those days because he slapped a young lecturer who had just been recruited and who did not know that particular student was the star of Department and its faculty. It was our final exam. He was summoned to appear before a disciplinary panel and said bluntly that university degrees were awarded on the basis of character and learning. Check: it was always the character before learning.

He has a First Class but was given a 2: 1. He was later named a postgraduate assistant. He was also recommended for a Commonwealth scholarship and sent to Cambridge for graduate studies.
It would later prove to be a true First Class Brain. It was also the practice in those days for lecturers to remind brilliant students of the achievements of those who had obtained the first-class degrees. Because they were not too many, a First Class graduate served for many years as a role model for later generations.
It was also the case that there were more First Class graduates in Science, Engineering and Applied Sciences. The Humanities produced fewer First Class graduates. Some of our teachers used to ask, “What do you want to write that will earn you a First Class?

Must it be really exceptional to know all the answers of literature, history or philosophy? “Those were the days when a teacher started a class and frightened him with the information that the last student who got a grade A on the course was a certain Teacher so and so” sat in this same class 30 years ago! “If you have to get an A, you would have to prove to me that you are smarter than him.”

University officials created such great myths around a First Class degree that many students simply did not want to commit suicide by trying to get one, only to be disappointed at the end of the day. The students who tried were not necessarily popular. They were labeled “triangular students,” “bookworm,” “Effiko,” or “Akukwo.” Students in the 2: 1 category felt more relaxed, many of them could even be as good as First Class students, but simply did not bother to apply enough. Students 2: 2 were easily the most popular. They would proudly say that they “wanted to go to university and also to allow the university to pass through them.” Maybe they were right.

In later life, many 2: 2 graduates still ended up with Ph.Ds. and even became professors, or industry captains. We also had those students in the Third Class and Step categories: we jokingly referred to them as “letting my people go, not-future-ambition.” If he finished with a First Class, his colleagues congratulated and admired him, but they did not feel as if they had failed in any way.

The Nigerian educational system in those days was so good that every student left the campus confident that he or she had been well equipped. The First Class graduates certainly did not enjoy special privileges. There were job opportunities in the country. Companies would come to school and youth camps to recruit potential staff, and many “Let go my people” graduates also have jobs and opportunities as soon as they graduate!

Much has changed. It seems that there is now more emphasis on people to get better paper grades, and how our universities produce first-class skills, soon there will be a first-class degree in every corner. One justification given is that the population of students in Nigerian universities and the number of courses has increased. 153 universities, of course, expect more first-class graduates. It is also possible that university students in Nigeria are smarter than ever today. Except that the quality of their qualifications disagree with the quality of their skills or the environment that produces. No one will deny that the quality of our universities, both public and private, is low, for example. Where are the eminent scholars of our first-class university graduates? Where the first-class universities are produce high grades?

In the same period that Nigerian universities have produced more than 3000 first-class graduates, only University of Nigeria University of Ibadan- was ranked among the top 800 universities in the world, number 601 of September 2015 in the Nigerian system more than me , Nigerian universities boasted world class intellectuals, with some of them ranked among the best in their field. There were first-rate libraries and research laboratories in our universities, and the atmosphere was conducive to intellectual activity.

Obafemi Awolowo University, then known as the University of Ife, was considered the most beautiful campus of Africa! Tourists visited our universities to visit the zoos or take pictures. Animals in zoos have been sold or consumed, libraries are old, with some now digitized, laboratories are non-existent or lack of equipment. University authorities complain about underfunding; Teachers do not always receive their salaries and research grants.

The idea of the university has problems. Today, Nigerians are becoming academic essays and research for academic teachers, “published in departmental reviews or magazines published by friends in other departments and printed in Somolu or Dubai. There are teachers who have never published an article in an international journal or any serious investigation carried out. An official of the National Commission of Universities, quoted by the Daily Trust, tried to justify the abundance of the class first in Nigerian universities by saying that NUC does not know that everyone buy first-class degrees and that “Our system is one of the best.” NUC mentality.

Could it be that exams have become too easy or that teachers have become less rigorous in setting standards? It is sad to hear, for example, students of the social sciences, social sciences Administration and some universities now sit only for multiple choice examinations at the end of the semester because they are numerous and teachers can not mark copies review? Our education system is far behind the rest of the world. Are we dealing with a quality inflation problem? Any degree at all, serves no purpose without the skills and competencies to justify it. Private universities in Nigeria are known to give high marks as a marketing strategy to attract wealthy parents to sponsor them.
A first class or 2: 1 course can get a job and offer an advantage over the unemployment crisis in the country, but what will keep you at work is much more than the paper you have: talent, skills, Competition, creativity, people and communication skills and ability to work with a team to achieve results.

Many employers of labor in Nigeria have had to reconvert new recruits because they are often confronted with graduates with good grades, you do not know how to write or think, or they may have learned what they know by simulation or alternative methods. This is the real and worrying trend, and it is getting worse: evidence can be seen more and more about the poor quality of public debate in the public and private sectors and our cultural life.

Many professional associations are trying to raise the standard by setting strict standards for member qualification, but what is a collegial system it could have adopted the tactics of G / M companies, offering bonus ups to gain market share? Has come to schools and youth corps camps to recruit potential staff, and many “Let my people go” graduates also got jobs and opportunities as soon as they graduated! Many things have changed. Looks like it is now more focus on people getting better paper grades, and how our universities are churning out the first-class degrees, very soon there will be a first class degree at every corner of street. This is justified by the fact that the number of students in Nigerian universities and the number of courses has increased. With 153 universities, we should logically, according to this argument, expect more first-class graduates. In addition it is possible in Nigeria that today’s students are smarter than those before them. Except that the quality of their degrees is at odds with the quality of their skills or the environment that produce them. No one will dispute that the quality of our universities, private and public two, is low, for example. Where are the outstanding researchers in our universities who raise first-class graduates? Where are the churning first high-grade universities? Within the same period Nigerian universities have produced more than 3,000 first-class graduates, a single Nigerian university -University of Ibadan- CLASSÉ was the top of the world Among the 800 universities, under number 601 to September 2015 In the old Nigerian system that I have described, Nigerian universities boasted world class intellectuals, with some of them ranking higher among their fields. There were research libraries and laboratories in our universities and the environment was conducive to the intellectual University pursuit.Obafemi Awolowo, known as the University of Ife Then was considered the most beautiful campus in Africa! Tourists visited our universities to visit the zoo or take photographs. The animals of the zoo have been sold or consumed, the libraries are old, with some now digitized, laboratories are non-existent or they are lacking material. Academic authorities complain about lack of funding; Teachers do not always receive their salaries and grants. The research concept of the university is in trouble. These days, Nigerian academics become professors with “scientists, research essays” published in departmental journals or in reviews published by their friends in other departments and printed in Somolu or Dubai. There are professors who have never published an article in an international journal or carried out important research. An official of the National Commission of Universities quoted by the Daily Trust has tried to justify the first-class gogo in Nigerian universities by saying NUC does not know everyone to buy first-class degrees and that “our system is the ‘one of the best. “I hope this is not the state of mind of the NUC. Could it be the examinations that have become too easy that teachers or less rigorous have become in the establishment of standards? It is sad to hear for example, students in the humanities that, and management and social sciences in some universities now sit only for multiple-choice examinations at the end of the semester because they are so numerous and teachers cannot mark papers exam? Our education system is far behind the rest of the world. Are we dealing with a quality inflation problem? Any degree at all, serves no purpose without the skills and competencies to justify it. Private universities in Nigeria would be best known for giving high marks as a marketing strategy to attract wealthy parents to them. A to patronize First Class or 2: 1 degree May you find a job, and you provide an advantage in face of unemployment The crisis in the country, but what will keep you at work is something much more than the paper you hold: talent, skills, competence, creativity, people and communication skills and ability to work With a team to reach the results. Many employers in Nigeria, have had to reconvert the new recruits because they are often faced with graduates with good grades, can not write, or who think, or can – be told the WHO everything they know by simulation or alternative methods. What is really the, worrying trend, and it is only getting worse: evidence can be seen, increasingly, in the poor quality of public debate, public and private sectors and our culture life. Many professional associations are trying To raise the bar by setting stringent qualification standards for membership, but what is the utility of a university system that can have the tactics of GSM companies ADOPTED, offering better bonus ups, to gain market share?

Share.

About Author

Thesnipernews Is a Global Network for News Dissemination with it Focal Point on Youths in Politics, Sports, Entertainment, Technology, Education, Etcetera

Leave A Reply